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Active or passive safety devices: a useful debate?

Maria Kapoula considers the debate on active vs passive safety pen needles and discusses the question: which type of device is preferable when the full range of human factors are assessed?

In 2010, the use of safety devices for injections or infusions was mandated by European legislation to protect healthcare workers and carers from needlestick injuries (NSIs).1 Such legislation was also introduced earlier in the US in 2000, as awareness grew and the drive to protect healthcare professionals from serious or fatal infections in healthcare settings began in earnest. The market for safety products continues to grow today, with one analyst firm estimating the current global market valuation at $2,038 million, growing to $3,009 million by 2026 – registering a compound annual growth rate of 8.1% across the period.2

These safety devices have evolved into two main categories: active and passive. An active device requires the user to shield the needle after use through manual intervention. A passive device automatically shields the needle after use, with no intervention. There is a long-running debate that discusses the merits of active safety pen needles over passive safety pen needles, typically focusing solely on the issue of safety. Although safety is undoubtedly a key issue, it is just one of many factors to be considered when selecting an appropriate drug delivery device.

The complete injection experience

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Upcoming Events

AfPP Annual Conference 2022

University of York
8-11 September 2022

Infection 360: What's trending in infection prevention & control

Edgbaston Stadium, Birmingham
27-28 September 2022

IP2022 IS COMING TO BOURNEMOUTH IN OCTOBER 2022

Bournemouth
17-19 October 2022

UKHCA Conference: Listen Up

Pendulum Hotel and Manchester Conference Centre, Manchester
3rd November 2022

MEDICA 2022

Dusseldorf Germany
14th November - 17th November

Future Surgery 2022

ExCel, London
15th - 16th November 2022

Access the latest issue of Clinical Services Journal on your mobile device together with an archive of back issues.

Download the FREE Clinical Services Journal app from your device's App store

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